2020 southern book prize
 Read This! Books with Street Cred...

The Truants by Kate Weinburg Kate Weinberg's debut novel of suspense weaves a tale of obsession, deception, and misguided love. Jess Walker is a young woman who enters an uninspiring university in East Anglia for the sole purpose of being a student of the charismatic professor of literature, Lorna Clay, who seems to have taken the position under a cloud of suspicion from her past. Clay will be conducting studies on the life and work of Agatha Christie, with an underlying theme, "People disappear when they most want to be seen."

Jess not only falls under her thrall, but also that of her three new friends who introduce her to a lifestyle of excess and awakenings, with tragic and life-altering consequences.This is a moody, mesmerizing, and literary read.

The Truants by Kate Weinburg (List price: $26.00, G.P. Putnam's Sons), recommended by The Country Bookshop, Southern Pines, NC.

 Indie Booksellers Are Talking About...

Big Lies in a Small Town

Southern indie booksellers are buzzing about: A Good Neighborhood by Therese Anne Fowler
St. Martin's Press | List Price: $27.99.

 A Winter 2020 Okra Pick


Copperfish Books, Punta Gorda, FL

I could not stop reading this book, even though at one point I wanted to stop, because I knew it wasn't going to end well. A blend of Romeo and Juliet with Hatfield and McCoy, set in a "nice" contemporary American neighborhood where "these things shouldn't happen." A heart-breaking, eye-opening must-read!


McIntyre's Fine Books, Pittsboro, NC

...A tragic story that so exactingly encapsulates this era of entitlement we are muscling our way through, where McMansions sprout like weeds, money talks more than reasons, and lives are changed irrevocably because of cultural distrust. Frankly, the best description I can provide for this powerful novel is: WOW!


Story on the Square, McDonough, GA

I can't put into words the emotions I feel after reading this book, but I what I can say is that Therese Anne Folwer has written a masterpiece. This powerful story is about the Whitmans, a white family, who have just moved next door to a black family, the Alston-Holts. Juniper Whitman and Xavier Alston-Holt are teenagers who fall in love with each other, but tension arises after Xavier's mother Valerie files a lawsuit against Juniper's stepdad Brad. Fowler's writing from the African-American perspective and experience was done beautifully and right. I want everyone to read this book!


 Current Southern Indie Bestseller List...

Southern Bestsellers

For the week ending 2/9/2020.

HARDCOVER FICTION
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. American Dirt
Jeanine Cummins, Flatiron Books, $27.99, 9781250209764
2. A Long Petal of the Sea
Isabel Allende, Ballantine, $28, 9781984820150
3. Where the Crawdads Sing
Delia Owens, Putnam, $26, 9780735219090
4. Weather
Jenny Offill, Knopf, $23.95, 9780385351102
5. The Dutch House
Ann Patchett, Harper, $27.99, 9780062963673
1. A Very Stable Genius
Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig, Penguin Press, $30, 9781984877499
2. Talking to Strangers
Malcolm Gladwell, Little Brown, $30, 9780316478526
3. The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse
Charlie Mackesy, HarperOne, $22.99, 9780062976581
4. Educated
Tara Westover, Random House, $28, 9780399590504
5. The Body
Bill Bryson, Doubleday, $30, 9780385539302

 A SIBA Okra Pick | SIBA Book Award winners and finalists! |  Special to the Southern List

 From the Current Crop of Fresh Okra Picks...

Bells for Eli"A stunning debut, Bells for Eli establishes Susan Beckham Zurenda as one of the most exciting new voices in Southern fiction," says Cassandra King Conroy, award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of five novels and the memoir Tell Me a Story: My Life with Pat Conroy. "In this tender, beautifully-rendered novel, the powerful connection between cousins Delia and Eli takes them on a journey fraught with longing, desire, and heartbreak. Through loss, Delia comes to understand that the bonds of love can never truly be broken."

First cousins Ellison (Eli) Winfield and Adeline (Delia) Green are meant to grow up happily and innocently across the street from one another amid the supposed wholesome values of small-town Green Branch, South Carolina, in the 1960s and 70s. But Eli's tragic accident changes the trajectory of their lives and of those connected to them. Shunned and even tortured by his peers for his disfigurement and frailty, Eli struggles for acceptance in childhood as Delia passionately devotes herself to defending him.

Delia's vivid and compassionate narrative voice presents Eli as a confident young man in adolescence—the visible damage to his body gone—but underneath hide indelible wounds harboring pain and insecurity, scars that rule his impulses. And while Eli cherishes Delia more than anyone and attempts to protect her from her own troubles, he cares not for protecting himself. It is Delia who has that responsibility, growing more challenging each year. Bells for Eli is a lyrical and tender exploration of the relationship between cousins drawn together through tragedy in a love forbidden by social constraints and a family whose secrets must stay hidden.

Susan Beckham Zurenda masterfully transports readers into a small Southern town where quiet, ordinary life becomes extraordinary. In this compelling coming of age story, culture, family, friends, bullies, and lovers propel two young people to unite to guard each other in a world where love, hope, and connectedness ultimately triumph.

Mercer Univeristy Press | 9780881467376 | March 2, 2020

 The Latest from Lady Banks' Commonplace Book...

American Dirt

When American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins went from one of the most anticipated novels of the year to one of the most controversial, it proved a challenge for bookstores that had high expectations for the book.

A novel about a Mexican mother and her child fleeing to the United States to escape the violence that killed the rest of their family, the book was billed as "A Grapes of Wrath for our times" and a definitive book about the contemporary immigrant experience.

Once the book was published, however, it generated a rising swell of controversy and pushback, especially from the Latinx community. American Dirt was criticized for perpetuating stereotypes, and cultural appropriation. The waves have been felt at all levels of the book industry, from  independent bookstore to Oprah.

Southern booksellers, by and large, have responded to the controversy as an opportunity for discussion and raising awareness. "I have been discussing with customers the controversy of the book, and how the publishing industry has overlooked authors #OwnVoices," said Deanna Bailey of Story on the Square in McDonough, GA. "Criticism are valid, and I'm happy to listen to them," said Angel Schroeder of Sunrise Books in High Point, NC. "Any book that generates discussion and debate is welcome in the bookstore," said Laura Taylor of Oxford Exchange in Tampa, FL.

Because booksellers are a group that believes reading more about an issue can only help, many of them expanded their store displays to include other books about immigration, discrimination, and Latinx and Mexican culture, like Scuppernong Books in Greensboro, NC:

American Dirt Display at Scuppernong Books

Charis Books & More, the feminist bookstore in Atlanta, anticipated the controversy and posted one of the more considered statements to their social media followers after Oprah selected American Dirt for her book club, along with, naturally, a suggested reading list:

Today Oprah Winfrey chose American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins as her newest bookclub pick. Jeanine Cummins identifies as a white woman with a Puerto Rican grandmother. American Dirt, a novel about immigration and the crisis at the Mexico and U.S. border has received an enormous amount of publishing industry praise and buy-in. And a significant amount of concern, sadness, and anger from Mexican-American and Latinx authors who feel harmed by the book's broad portrayal of Mexican culture. We believe it is important to acknowledge the opportunity costs to Mexican-American writers whose works do not receive the fiscal or political support that American Dirt is receiving. #OwnVoices is a social media movement designed to focus support on authors who are writing books from within their own cultures, not because it is wrong to imagine a world outside your own experience but because when white writers are elevated for telling the stories of people of color it is writers of color who often fail to receive financial and political support to publish their own stories.

Today we invite you to explore these #OwnVoices authors whose books are currently on our shelves (along with many others). Thank you to Myriam Gurba for her leadership in this discussion. #FeministBookstore

Suggested Reading from Charis Books

1. Citizen Illegal by José Olivarez
2. Mean by Myriam Gurba
3. Una casa propia Historias de mi vida by Sandra Cisneros
4. I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez
5. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
6. Everyone Knows You Go Home by Natalia Sylvester
7. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldúa
8. The Affairs of the Falcóns: A Novel by Melissa Rivero
9. Native Country of the Heart: A Memoir by Cherríe Moraga
10. Dominicana by Angie Cruz

Read independently, and shop local.

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 Southern Books | Authors | Literary News...

Southern Book Prize Winner

The 2020 Southern Book Prize Winners

(Asheville, NC) – Celebrate Independents!  Announcing the 2020 Southern Book Prize Winners -- the best in Southern literature, from the people who would know . . . Southern Independent Booksellers and their independently minded customers. Designed to honor great Southern voices, The Southern Book Prize is awarded to books published in the previous year that are Southern in nature – either by a Southern author, or set in the South, or both.

Nominated by booksellers and selected via popular vote by Southern booksellers and their customers, the 2020 Southern Book Prize Winners were selected from a list of finalists from ballots submitted by over 1000 Southern readers, representing over 150 Southern independent bookstores.  The chosen books represent the indie answer to the question “What was the best Southern book of the year?”

2020 Southern Book Prize Winners

FICTION

The Magnetic Girl by Jessica Handler
Hub City Press, 9781938235481
“A grand, dark, mysterious historical novel filled with dark power and ambivalence, The Magnetic Girl captures a time and place, not only in the life of a teenage girl but in our country as well. Filled with the shifting longings of adolescence against a vaudeville backdrop, Handler's novel explores the dangerous journey from childhood to adulthood when our budding powers both enthrall and terrify us.” – Brian Lampkin, Scuppernong Books, Greensboro, NC

NONFICTION

Tell Me A Story: My Life with Pat Conroy by Cassandra King Conroy
William Morrow, 9780062905628

“Cassandra King Conroy tells a compelling story of her courtship and marriage to Pat Conroy. As you can imagine, being with him was never boring, and Cassandra has the stories to prove it. Filled with laughter as well as tears, you will be carried through the ups and downs of Pat's life like the tidal current of Pat's beloved Battery Creek outside his Beaufort home. As hard as it is to read about Pat's sickness and death, Cassandra writes about it with compassion and love. Her words from the heart are truly beautiful.” – Linda Hodges, Fiction Addiction, Greenville, SC

CHILDREN’S

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi
Wednesday Books, 9781250144546

“Chokshi's dazzling world of alchemy and occult is unforgettable and I will dream of golden bees and gilded ballrooms until the sequel comes out. Astonishingly beautiful and fantastically imagined.”  – Sami Thomason, Square Books, Oxford, MS

For more information about the Southern Book Prize:
https://www.authorsroundthesouth.com/read-this/siba-book-awards

George WeinsteinWhen I was a kid in suburban Maryland in the 1970s and ‘80s, bookstores seemed ubiquitous. We had two independent bookstores at opposite ends of a single shopping center. The mall boasted one chain bookstore after another. Books were everywhere, and everybody in my family had a preferred store based on stock, layout, lighting, and staff personalities.

I wish I remembered the name of my favorite independent bookstore back then. Though I can’t recall it, I can tell you exactly what the store looked like. Glass-fronted on two sides, it had a mitered corner so as not to obstruct the view of the treasures inside. In fact, the first time my parents took me there, I learned the term “miter” from my dad, as I ran my pudgy index finger down the subtle seam that joined the windows.

Once they led me through the door, I completely forgot about the glass. All manner of books lay and stood before me. To my left, dozens of low, square platforms supported glossy coffee-table books with lush photographs and illustrations, neat columns of fiction and nonfiction hardbacks, and stacks of comic books arranged like ziggurats and epic Marvel-versus-DC mahjong games. To my right, mass-market paperbacks lined row upon row of free-standing shelves and, beyond these, rotating racks of still more pocket paperbacks.

Howard Carter’s first glimpse of King Tut’s tomb couldn’t have felt more momentous.

Every weekend, I contrived a pilgrimage to that bookstore. Toys "R" Us never saw another dime of my allowance.

Every weekend, I contrived a pilgrimage to that bookstore. Toys "R" Us never saw another dime of my allowance. From the checkout station near the door, a staff member always greeted us. Once they learned our tastes, they noted the newly arrived stock that would appeal to me and to whichever parent had the unenviable task of trying to limit my browsing and decision-making time. As if anything could be more important in their Saturday schedule than my evaluation of the relative merits of the latest Avengers and Justice League comics or competing titles that promised to unlock the secrets of Loch Ness, Project Blue Book, and the Bermuda Triangle.

Watch What You SayIn a way, I grew up in that bookstore. My interests expanded, and, guided by the always-helpful staff, I kept discovering new sections of the store I’d overlooked before. In my teen years, an allowance gave way to summer job money. A good thing, because the books that captivated me were more expensive. I learned to budget and save due to that bookstore. My first serious crushes were on the pretty cashier and several customers—which taught me how to deal with longing, rejection, and heartache.

I went off to college and, during spring break of my freshman year, I returned to find the store had closed, a victim of changing tastes and a sharp-toothed recession. This helped to teach me how to cope with loss.

Now, whenever I visit my local indie bookstore, I still get excited. Maybe I’ll discover something life-changing. I know exactly where on Earth I stood when I first felt that thrill of possibility.


George Weinstein is the author of six novels. His latest is the suspense thriller and 2019 Okra Pick Watch What You Say. George is also the once and current president of the 105-year-old Atlanta Writers Club and the creator and director of the nationally renowned Atlanta Writers Conference.

Veteran novelist Amy Greene (Bloodroot and Longman) and debut novelist Elizabeth Chiles Shelburne have several things in common: both are native Appalachians, both write about their mountain origins, and lucky for us, they both have a book coming out from Blair this fall. Elizabeth’s debut novel is Holding On To Nothing (pub. date 10/22/19). Amy Greene, with her husband Trent Tompson, edited Step into the Circle: Writers in Modern Appalachia, a collection of essays and photographs in which writers write about each other and their homes in Appalachia (pub. date 12/1/2019).

Amy and Elizabeth sat down recently for a chat about their upcoming books.

Amy Greene: Elizabeth, I've had the good fortune over the past year to become familiar with you and your writing. We grew up in the same mountains, but you left East Tennessee to study at Amherst College and have now settled in Massachusetts with your husband and children. What moved you to return, as a storyteller, to your Appalachian roots?

Holding On To NothingElizabeth Chiles Shelburne: I think home is home. When people ask me where I'm from, I still answer “East Tennessee,” even if they are actually asking what town I live in now so we can arrange for school pickup.  It's just not a choice to give another answer. I've been a long time gone, but East Tennessee is still my home. And, perhaps because our childhoods are so formative, my brain and heart still beat with stories and characters, both real and imagined, from there. At some point, maybe I'll catch up and start telling stories from the place I've lived for a while now, but it hasn't happened yet. I also think that there may never be enough stories about our region, which is a shame given that through music and storytelling it's occupied such a formative place in American history. I just never tire of the people there, of how hard-working, joyous, and hilarious they can be, even when circumstances might dictate otherwise. It was such a gift to be from there, and I miss it every day. 

Now, from me to you: What made you and Trent want to explore Appalachian writers through pictures and words? It is an absolutely stunning book, and I can't wait to put it out for people to read.  Why did y'all want to explore that topic now and have other writers profile each other (which I loved!)? 

AG: When Trent and I met at a writers' colony in the Tennessee mountains, we connected both because of our Appalachian roots and our love of literature. Since then, we've had countless conversations over coffee about how the arts—particularly the literary and visual arts—have given our people voices to tell their own stories, through words and images, in ways the media from outside the region often gets wrong. Those conversations over morning coffee became a vision for a coffee table book combining the literary and visual arts to show how the literature of Appalachia has helped to progress its entire culture.

ECS: I love that. Those conversations over morning coffee are sometimes the most universal ones! And I couldn't agree more about the portrayals of Appalachia. I started writing my book because I felt that the media from outside the region just didn't portray the people I knew accurately. When people tell their own stories, the full complexities of their lives get portrayed. That's what I tried to put on the page with Jeptha and Lucy's story. 

AG: Now, a fun question: How did you celebrate when you learned that your debut novel would be published by Blair?

ECS: I celebrated the news the way I celebrate all good (and bad!) days in our house: I popped the top on a beer! Like Jeptha, my main character, I very much enjoy a good beer. I've gotten a taste for super hoppy New England-style IPAs over the years, and I always keep some craft IPA in the fridge. They are my go-to for celebrations! I especially love one from a local Cambridge brewery called Lamplighter, and my favorite of theirs is called Birds of a Feather. (I edited much of Holding On To Nothing after my kids went to bed while sitting at Lamplighter, nursing one beer over three hours and listening to bluegrass.) 

AG: A very fitting way to celebrate! When I got a book deal for Bloodroot, I bought a pair of leather boots I'd had my eye on—but they were on sale, which probably speaks volumes about where I come from and how I was raised.

Step Into the CircleECS: I love that. And yes, the on-sale part definitely does speak volumes about growing up where we did, doesn't it? One thing I loved so much about Appalachian Reckoning, the amazing book edited by Meredith McCarroll and Anthony Harkins, was that I learned the word bricoleur, a person who makes new things of the things they've collected around them. It was a fancy word for the way I grew up and the way I saw people all around me live. 

Back to you:After writing such gorgeous fiction (Bloodroot and Long Man) for so long, how was it to be immersed in nonfiction, both the writing and the editing, for a while with Step Into the Circle? Was it hard to transition between the two? 

AG: It wasn't too hard to put on my editing hat. For me, revising is more than half the writing process. It doesn't hurt that I learned from the best. My editor at Knopf, Robin Desser, is brilliant at what she does. Her editorial voice lives in my head, and I listened while reading the essays included in Step into the Circle. To be fair, there wasn't much editing to do, given the caliber of the writers involved in this project.

ECS: Editors are the best, aren't they? And, is it just us or is there something about editors named Robin?! [e.g., Robin Miura, editor at Blair]

AG: One last question (well, two last questions) for you: It sounds like as a writer you'll continue to mine the rich literary terrain of our homeland. What can we expect from you next? Are you working on another novel?

ECS: I'm almost done with the first draft of my next novel, and yes, it's set in East Tennessee! One or two of the characters from this book come back in that one, although the book is very different. I spent a lot of time in my twenties reporting on tuberculosis, now the number-one infectious killer in the world. It's a huge issue and not one that many people in the U.S. care about, despite there being regular, if small, outbreaks here. I wanted to write fiction about tuberculosis, but I also wanted to write another book set in East Tennessee. I found an article about a very infectious strain of TB that broke out in an OshKosh factory in Tennessee twenty years ago and thought, "A ha!" Currently, I'd describe the book this way: 
Tennessee native Alice Campbell had been living happily in Kenya, working as a doctor, with her husband and two kids. But when her daughter Rosalind dies from an undiagnosed tuberculosis infection, Alice’s marriage falls apart and she will do anything to get away from the disease, even take over her father’s old medical practice back in East Tennessee, a place she swore she’d never move back to. Unbeknownst to anyone, however, a TB epidemic is about to rage through East Tennessee and the United States, and Alice is the only one with the experience, courage, and insight to fight against it.
And last question for you:What are you working on? I can't wait to read your next book! 

AG: I'm so excited to see what you write next and how your writing life takes shape in general. I know great things are ahead, both for and from you!

Right now, I'm working on another novel set in East Tennessee as well, about a quarry town during the Great War. Working on Step into the Circle has been such an inspiration as I birth this third book, being steeped in the words of so many writers I admire.

Thank you, Elizabeth, for this conversation, and for sharing your beautiful story with me and the world!

------

Elizabeth Chiles ShelburneELIZABETH CHILES SHELBURNE grew up reading, writing, and shooting in East Tennessee. After graduating from Amherst College, she became a writer and a staff editor at the Atlantic Monthly. Her nonfiction work has been published in the Atlantic Monthly, Boston Globe, and Globalpost, among others. She worked on this novel in Grub Street’s year-long Novel Incubator course, under Michelle Hoover and Lisa Borders. Her essay on how killing a deer made her a feminist was published in Click! When We Knew We Were Feminists, edited by Courtney E. Martin and J. Courtney Sullivan. Holding On To Nothing is her debut novel. She lives outside Boston with her husband and four children.

Amy GreeneAMY GREENE's first novel Bloodroot was a New York Times and national bestseller. In 2010 Greene won the Weatherford Award for Appalachian Fiction. Her second novel Long Man was a Washington Post “Top Book of the Year.” In 2016 Greene won the Willie Morris Award for Southern Literature and was inducted into the East Tennessee Literary Hall of Fame. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times and Glamour magazine, among other publications. Greene has lectured and conducted workshops across the country. Amy is cofounder of Bloodroot Mountain, a nonprofit organization based in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains.

Constance LombardoConstance Lombardo’s debut picture book, Everybody Says Meow, publishes on November 5. She is the author/illustrator of the middle grade Mr. Puffball books, and lives in Asheville.

Bobbie: In your house, does everybody say “meow”?

Constance: Some say ‘meow’. Others say ‘woof,’ ‘tweet,’ ‘guinea pig noise,’ and ‘Mom, what’s for dinner’?

Bobbie: How was working on this picture book different from your middle grade novels?

Constance: I love MG novels, but picture books hold an extra special place in my heart. It’s like writing poetry, in a way, because every word counts. And every page has to make a splash, visually and textually, and lead naturally into the next, which must be both surprising and inevitable. Also, the thought of parents and librarians reading Everybody Says Meow to young children and (hopefully) making them laugh… that makes me SO happy!

Bobbie: Your Mr. Puffball illustrations are black and white, while EVERYBODY SAYS MEOW is full color. What was that like? Did you obsess over getting just the right colors for your illustrations?

Everybody Says Meow Mr. Puffball Escape from Culinary Island

Constance: Black and white is definitely my comfort zone. Working with color, (in traditional media – pen and watercolor) was a thrilling challenge, especially finding the right colors and keeping it consistent.

For example, I conceived Myrtle (the MC, whose name is never mentioned in this book of few words,) as pink. I tried every possible pink, until my wise Art Director said, ‘Maybe she should just be a gentle grey.’ I got out my Payne’s Grey, added water, and… Bingo!

"The image of a bossy kitten trying to get everybody to say meow popped into my head. As I developed it, the idea of everybody’s right to their own voice became clear."

Bobbie: Reviewers have said that MEOW is a book that celebrates diversity and inclusiveness. Did you have that theme in mind when you started writing? Or were you mostly thinking about cats (and ducks, and frogs)?

Constance: This book began with our quiet kitten Gandalf. When I fed him and our talkative older cat, Myrtle, she would MEOW like wild, while he simply stared. (adorable!) To encourage him to talk, I started saying, “See? Everybody says meow!”

The image of a bossy kitten trying to get everybody to say meow popped into my head. As I developed it, the idea of everybody’s right to their own voice became clear. So it evolved organically from my kitten inspiration and my personal beliefs.  

Bobbie: What illustrators and authors inspire you?

Constance: So many! Some contemporary author/illustrators who inspire me include Sergio Ruzzier, Lauren Child, David Ezra Stein, and Jillian Tamaki (especially This One Summer.) Also, Emil Ferris, whose My Favorite Thing is Monsters proves beyond a doubt that illustration is Art. (w a capital A.)

This One Summer My Favorite Thing is Monsters

Bobbie: When you got your BFA in Illustration from Syracuse University, did you think you’d end up illustrating children’s books?

Constance: I imagined doing illustrations for album covers. (Remember those?) I never thought about kids books until my kid was born (now 16.) I rediscovered my love of Arnold Lobel, Beatrix Potter, and William Steig. The rest is history. Or will be in a few decades.

Bobbie: What’s next for you?

Constance: My news is I’m learning how to use Procreate on the iPad. Digital art is more fun than I imagined. Thankfully, my teen helps me, when he’s in the mood to talk to me (infrequently.)

Bobbie: Finally, I have to ask: are you ever going to write a dog book?

Constance: Now that I have an old sweetheart of a beagle, signs point to yes (to quote the Magic 8 Ball.) The bigger question is: any editors out there looking for a book about an old, stubborn, but kind-hearted beagle with a nose for solving mysteries?


Constance Lombardo is an author, illustrator, and cat expert who can say meow in several languages. She is the creator of a middle grade series, Mr. Puffball, about a clever group of Hollywood cats. Stick Dog creator Tom Watson called Mr. Puffball “freaky, furry, and first-rate fun!” When she isn’t drawing or writing, Constance likes to visit the many waterfalls in Western North Carolina or rummage through Asheville’s local indie bookstores. Plus, she likes carrot cake. Visit her at www.constancelombardo.com.

Announcing the 2020 Southern Book Prize Finalists

Southern Book PrizeSouthern independent booksellers have selected the finalists for the 2020 Southern Book Prize, representing bookseller favorites from 2019 that are Southern in nature—either about the South, or by a Southern writer. Nominations were submitted by bookstore members of the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) and culled from books that have received strong reviews from Southern booksellers. The sixteen finalists which received the highest number of nominations are a collection of the most beloved “hand sells” in fiction, nonfiction and children’s literature of the year.

The finalists are now placed on the 2020 Southern Book Prize ballot. Winners in each category will be chosen by popular vote from readers who support Southern independent bookstores. Participating bookstores will distribute ballots to their customers, which can be returned to be entered into a raffle to win a complete set of the finalist titles. An online ballot will also be available at www.southernbookprize.com.

Voting opens the week of the Love Your Bookstore Challenge, November 8-17, building on the momentum of the grassroots campaign to encourage book buying at local bookstores and giving store customers chances to win more prizes. Voting will run from November 8 through February 1, 2020.

2020 is the second year the Southern Book Prize has been opened up to a popular vote. SIBA launched the public ballot for the 2019 prize, shifting the voting period to build momentum and excitement during the holiday season.

“The response from our member stores and the general public was overwhelming,” said SIBA Executive Director Wanda Jewell. “Everyone got involved – booksellers, readers, authors – in the end nearly 3500 ballots were submitted from all over the South. It was a wonderful affirmation of how important and beloved our member bookstores are to their communities.”

Southern Book Prize winners will be announced on February 14, Valentine’s Day.

2020 Southern Book Prize Finalists

The Dutch House The Magnetic GirlNever Have I EverThe Nickel BoysNothing to See HereThis Tender Land

Fiction

Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson (William Morrow)
Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson (Ecco)
The Dutch House by Ann Patchett (Harper)
The Magnetic Girl by Jessica Handler (Hub City Press)
The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday)
This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger (Atria Books)

The Furious HoursI Miss You When You BlinkLate MigrationsSouthern Lady CodeTell Me a Story

Nonfiction

Tell Me a Story: My Life with Pat Conroy by Cassandra King (William Morrow)
Southern Lady Code by Helen Ellis (Doubleday)
Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss by Margaret Renkl (Milkweed Editions)
I Miss You When I Blink by Mary Laura Philpott (Atria Books)
Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep (Knopf)

The Gilded WolvesHum and SwishI Will BE FierceThe King of KindergartenRayne & Delilah's Midnite Matinee

Childrens

Hum and Swish by Matt Myers (Neal Porter Books)
Rayne & Delilah’s Midnite Matinee by Jeff Zentner (Crown Books for Young Readers)
I Will Be Fierce by Bea Birdsong (Roaring Brook Press)
The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi (Wednesday Books)
The King of Kindergarten by Derrick Barnes (Nancy Paulsen Books)

 

For more information contact:
Wanda Jewell, Executive Director
Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance
803-466-8853
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 



Parapalooza! Paragraphs Worth Spreading

Southern Indie Lit Crossword Puzzle Book

Do you know your Southern lit?

The Southern Indie Lit Crossword Puzzle Book

We dare you to use a pen on these crossword puzzles, each inspired by one of the winning titles of the SIBA Book Award, honoring ten years of the very best in Southern literature as chosen by the people who would know...Southern Independent Booksellers!

A great gift for your book club, for puzzle-lovers, and anyone who loves Southern literature. $9.95 paperback. Available at Southern Indie Bookstores. Need some hints or looking for answers? Pssst.